I’m taking Hurricane Michael with me to San Diego

When you’re on the eve of the most public presentation you’ve ever made, to a crowd of colleagues and experts well-versed in your trade, having not made any real, public presentations in some time, you start to get nervous. I … Continue reading I’m taking Hurricane Michael with me to San Diego

Isle de Jean Charles Speaks at Public Hearing on Relocation

The IdJC once claimed a territory of more than 22,000 acres. Years of oil and gas development, hurricanes, and climate change have reduced the island to a mere 325 acres today. The tribe lived mostly in isolation from the early 1700’s through the 1940s-1950s when the oil boom devastated their area. If anyone in the United States could be said the have the smallest contribution to climate change, it’s the people who lived on that island. Continue reading Isle de Jean Charles Speaks at Public Hearing on Relocation

The Magic Trick of the Century!

You almost won’t believe it until you’ve watched it several times. In the last century, the area around Terrebonne Bay, Louisiana (often referred to as Interior Lafourche), has flipped from being 90% land (1916) to 90% water (2016). This video shows how quickly and dramatically the landscape of south Louisiana changed to accommodate the oil, gas, and sulphur mining operations that fragmented large areas of marsh, and triggered and exacerbated subsequent land loss in the decades following. The communities who lived in the area migrated northward as the seas and surge ate away at the marsh. Today, all but a few close-knit communities and a handful of Native American tribes have abandoned the once prosperous marsh lands in search of safety and security farther from shore. For them, it’s a century-long trick with no magic. Continue reading The Magic Trick of the Century!

The Great Galveston Hurricane of 1900: A Review of “Isaac’s Storm”

Erik Larson’s 1999 “Isaac’s Storm” guides readers through the experience of the most deadly storm in U.S. history. Here are my thoughts on the novel and it’s translation into modern times. Continue reading The Great Galveston Hurricane of 1900: A Review of “Isaac’s Storm”

Fighting the urge to say “NO! You’ve got it all wrong!” #climatechapman

Listening to climate “skeptics” talk about climate zombies is frustrating. Listening to scientists talk about how to out-communicate them is even more irritating. But how does a grad student, as green as an Iceland spring, approach the elite researchers of her field and say, “you’re looking at this all wrong?” The science isn’t the issue. All of the scientific evidence out there proves we are right. We know we are right. We know what the consequences of business-as-usual will be. We’ve measured and modeled, and we’re all very worried. But we are not approaching climate communications in any radically new … Continue reading Fighting the urge to say “NO! You’ve got it all wrong!” #climatechapman

Colorado: A climate change frontier? #climatechapman

Colorado is refreshing. Having spent the last year-and-a-half in south Louisiana, I had forgotten the simple joys of a refinery-free landscape, bike lanes, and vegetarian diners. Driving through (and over) the Rocky Mountains is an experience best not summed in words (they’d never do it justice). I’ve never seen, much less touched, snow in June. But my trip to the AGU Chapman Conference quickly thrust itself into new territory when I reached an area afflicted with a strange sort of contaminate lurking in the woods: the Mountain Pine Beetle. Sure, it’s not as sexy as an EF-5 tornado or a … Continue reading Colorado: A climate change frontier? #climatechapman